Radio Frequency Coordination & Protection

Radio Frequency Protection

See:

Foundational Task: GEOSS Development and GCI Operations

Earth observations and its applications are dependent on radio frequencies to measure and collect the data upon which analyses, predictions and warnings are based, and to disseminate this information to governments, policy-makers, disaster management organizations, commercial interests and the general public.

These applications make use of a wide frequency spectrum — from a few kHz to several hundred GHz — and make use of a large variety of radio technologies and services provided from the ground, in situ or from space.

GEO recognizes radio frequency protection as being critically important, in particular in frequency bands where passive sensing measurements are performed. With WMO as the Lead in the Radio Frequency Protection Component of GEO's Earth Observing Systems Task, priority actions include:

  • Advocate protection for all parts of the radio frequency spectrum needed to measure, collect and disseminate Earth observation data. Monitor, with highest care, the case of passive bands, assessing the potential impact of interference on Earth observation applications and final products
  • Encourage GEO Members to liaise with national representatives in radio communication fora – to ensure sustained political support for radio-frequency protection
  • Undertake coordinated activities with representatives from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Link with the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science (IUCAF

Furthermore, The GEO-X Plenary highlighted the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz frequency range, which is of high importance to the Copernicus Sentinel-series satellites and other Earth observation (EO) missions of GEO Members.

Since January 2014, GEO has been working closely with Brazil, France, ESA, WMO and other partners to prepare for the meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radiocommunication Joint Task Group that was held from 21-31 July 2014 in Geneva. This meeting was a major milestone in the preparations for the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) where key decisions on radio frequency allocations will be taken.

GEO contributed to a WMO Position Paper and prepared a GEO Position paper, both of which were submitted to the Joint Task Group meeting. The GEO Secretariat Director also introduced the GEO Position Paper during the Joint Task Group meeting, stressing the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz band for Earth observation. We appreciate the support and collaboration exhibited over the last few months, and we remain hopeful that the regulations governing the use of this radio frequency band will not be modified at WRC-15 in 2015.

Earth observations and its applications are dependent on radio frequencies to measure and collect the data upon which analyses, predictions and warnings are based, and to disseminate this information to governments, policy-makers, disaster management organizations, commercial interests and the general public.

These applications make use of a wide frequency spectrum — from a few kHz to several hundred GHz — and make use of a large variety of radio technologies and services provided from the ground, in situ or from space.

GEO recognizes radio frequency protection as being critically important, in particular in frequency bands where passive sensing measurements are performed. With WMO as the Lead in the Radio Frequency Protection Component of GEO's Earth Observing Systems Task, priority actions include:

  • Advocate protection for all parts of the radio frequency spectrum needed to measure, collect and disseminate Earth observation data. Monitor, with highest care, the case of passive bands, assessing the potential impact of interference on Earth observation applications and final products
  • Encourage GEO Members to liaise with national representatives in radio communication fora – to ensure sustained political support for radio-frequency protection
  • Undertake coordinated activities with representatives from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Link with the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science (IUCAF

Furthermore, The GEO-X Plenary highlighted the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz frequency range, which is of high importance to the Copernicus Sentinel-series satellites and other Earth observation (EO) missions of GEO Members.

Since January 2014, GEO has been working closely with Brazil, France, ESA, WMO and other partners to prepare for the meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radiocommunication Joint Task Group that was held from 21-31 July 2014 in Geneva. This meeting was a major milestone in the preparations for the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) where key decisions on radio frequency allocations will be taken.

GEO contributed to a WMO Position Paper and prepared a GEO Position paper, both of which were submitted to the Joint Task Group meeting. The GEO Secretariat Director also introduced the GEO Position Paper during the Joint Task Group meeting, stressing the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz band for Earth observation. We appreciate the support and collaboration exhibited over the last few months, and we remain hopeful that the regulations governing the use of this radio frequency band will not be modified at WRC-15 in 2015.

Earth observations and its applications are dependent on radio frequencies to measure and collect the data upon which analyses, predictions and warnings are based, and to disseminate this information to governments, policy-makers, disaster management organizations, commercial interests and the general public.

These applications make use of a wide frequency spectrum — from a few kHz to several hundred GHz — and make use of a large variety of radio technologies and services provided from the ground, in situ or from space.

GEO recognizes radio frequency protection as being critically important, in particular in frequency bands where passive sensing measurements are performed. With WMO as the Lead in the Radio Frequency Protection Component of GEO's Earth Observing Systems Task, priority actions include:

  • Advocate protection for all parts of the radio frequency spectrum needed to measure, collect and disseminate Earth observation data. Monitor, with highest care, the case of passive bands, assessing the potential impact of interference on Earth observation applications and final products
  • Encourage GEO Members to liaise with national representatives in radio communication fora – to ensure sustained political support for radio-frequency protection
  • Undertake coordinated activities with representatives from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Link with the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science (IUCAF

Furthermore, The GEO-X Plenary highlighted the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz frequency range, which is of high importance to the Copernicus Sentinel-series satellites and other Earth observation (EO) missions of GEO Members.

Since January 2014, GEO has been working closely with Brazil, France, ESA, WMO and other partners to prepare for the meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radiocommunication Joint Task Group that was held from 21-31 July 2014 in Geneva. This meeting was a major milestone in the preparations for the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) where key decisions on radio frequency allocations will be taken.

GEO contributed to a WMO Position Paper and prepared a GEO Position paper, both of which were submitted to the Joint Task Group meeting. The GEO Secretariat Director also introduced the GEO Position Paper during the Joint Task Group meeting, stressing the need to preserve the 5350-5470 MHz band for Earth observation. We appreciate the support and collaboration exhibited over the last few months, and we remain hopeful that the regulations governing the use of this radio frequency band will not be modified at WRC-15 in 2015.